5 Bible Verses That Will Send Chills Down Your Spine

The Bible has a lot of amazing things hidden deep within its pages. If you look hard enough, you can find giants, epic battles, talking animals, dead people walking, fire raining from the sky, and plagues of epic proportions. As I was reading my Bible last week, I came across a verse that stopped me dead in my tracks. It was the kind of verse that gives you chills just from the sheer power and authority emanating from the words. Given that, I decided to look at some other verses that I’ve always found fascinating. The criteria for choosing these was simply to find the verses that really seemed to ooze with unbridled power and authority; the kind of verses that make you stop and marvel at our God of power, and for guys, the ones that you want to quote before rushing into battle! Without further ado, here we have 5 Bible Verse That Will Send Chills Down Your Spine.

#5. When His Wrath Is Great

Psalm 18: 6-11

In my distress I called upon the LordAnd cried out to my God; He heard my voice from His temple, And my cry came before Him, even to His ears.Then the earth shook and trembled; The foundations of the hills also quaked and were shaken, Because He was angry. Smoke went up from His nostrils, And devouring fire from His mouth; Coals were kindled by it. He bowed the heavens also, and came down With darkness under His feet. And He rode upon a cherub, and flew; He flew upon the wings of the wind.  He made darkness His secret place; His canopy around Him was dark waters And thick clouds of the skies.

This passage is absolutely mind blowing. Here we see the Psalmist crying out to God in his distress, and the reaction is like a mama bear reacting to her cub crying out in pain: pure rage directed at some unfortunate someone (except with God, it’s a righteous rage). God is a powerful Father and this passage really speaks to His love for us. It is so relate-able because we’ve all been in situations where someone we love is in danger and we rush to their side, ready to tear apart anyone who comes close. This is like that; except when God talks about it, it sounds a whole lot more impressive. It’s like a mouse crying out for fear of the cat, and Optimus Prime shows up to help.

Optimus

Step away from the mouse.

That’s what it’s like. We are so weak and He is so powerful. Seriously, just read that. He puts darkness under his feet. Take heart, Christian. The earth will tremble and darkness will be crushed under His feet when you call on the Lord. So call on him!

#4. When He Commands You Not to Be Afraid

Josh 1:9

Have I not commanded you? Be strong and of good courage; do not be afraid, nor be dismayed, for the Lord your God is with you wherever you go.

The context here is God speaking to Joshua when he took over for Moses. God instructed him to enter the promised land and to take it for an inheritance of Israel. As Joshua apparently realized, there were still people living in the promised land and God was essentially telling him to march into battle. This takes guts, and in verse 8, God tells Joshua to meditate on His word day and night, and immediately follows it up with the epic proclamation in verse 9. These words completely silence any doubt one could have about how to feel about this expedition. God preempts any doubts by asking, “Have I not commanded you?” If Joshua thought about asking questions, those thoughts were gone, as God commands Joshua to have courage; for God is with him. I imagine a general saying this to his army, someone like Maximus from Gladiator:

Have I not commanded you?!?

Have I not commanded you?!?

I imagine this is something that is said by a general of an army, specifically, Maximus from Gladiator. Just imagine him yelling that line in his powerfully masculine voice, like he did when he asked, “Are you not entertained?!?” God is with you, Christian. Have courage.

#3. When He Knows What Is in The Darkness

Daniel 2:22

He reveals deep and secret things; He knows what is in the darkness, And light dwells with Him.

This is the verse I read the other day that sent chills down my spine. As children, we’ve all feared what is in the dark, and sometimes, the darkness can still be a scary place.

Scary creatures lurk in the darkness

Scary creatures lurk in the darkness

And when it’s a spiritual darkness, the fear is a whole lot more intense! But we do not need to fear, because God knows what is in the darkness. We fear what we can’t see because we don’t know what is there, but God crushes that notion because He does know what is there. And the next line delivers the final blow: He is light. He has the only weapon that can destroy the darkness and it doesn’t stand a chance against him. And He is on our side. Incredible. Don’t be afraid of the dark; it’s power has been dissolved. This verse has a companion verse in Job 12:22, “He uncovers deep things out of darkness, And brings the shadow of death to light.”

#2. When He Tells You to Be Immoveable

1st Corinthians 15:58

Therefore, my beloved brethren, be steadfast, immovable, always abounding in the work of the Lord, knowing that your labor is not in vain in the Lord.

This was my anthem verse when I was a senior in high school. It just felt like such a good capstone to my education. After all God had taught me, now was the time to get down to work and put your nose to the grindstone. It’s one of those, “Man up, man” verses that always gets to me. In Christ, we are complete. In Christ, we have everything we need. And in Christ, nothing can move us. In Christ, we are like this to the enemy:

Your move, Satan.

Your move, Satan.

We are to be immovable, unshakable, completely solid in our faith. Jesus never wavered, and neither should we. Go Hulk on Satan and be immovable. Because who is on your side? The One who commands you not to be afraid, and who knows what is in the darkness, and the who crushes His enemies. Be immovable.

#1. When He Kills Death

1st Corinthians 15:55-57

“O Death, where is your sting? O Hades, where is your victory?”  The sting of death is sin, and the strength of sin is the law.  But thanks be to God, who gives us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ.

Also in 1 Corinthians 15, this is perhaps the most powerful verse in Scripture. The cross is in vain without the resurrection, and here, Paul mocks death because it has been vanquished. This is the greatest hope we have. Jesus freed us from the fear of death; and because of this we can do anything.

Like vanquish hell.

Hades, where is your victory?

We have victory over death; how much more spine-chilling does it get? It’s too big for us to comprehend that as Christians, we will never truly die. Because death has already been defeated and its sting is no more. Take heart, Christian. Christ has won the day, a devouring fire pours forth from His mouth, He has commanded you not to be afraid, He knows what is in the darkness and light dwells with him, He tells you to be immovable, and He has defeated death. What greater King could we serve? ——————————-   I hope you enjoyed that! It certainly gave me the chills a few times! If you liked it, please like our Facebook page at Two Snows and A Blog for more stuff like this, as well as content from my wife’s blog.

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Why The Church Should Not Embrace Environmentalism

earthrise-wide This is a response to this article at Venn Magazine and this post has been submitted to the magazine for consideration. 

Words matter.

In our communications driven culture, it’s important to use the right language to convey our message. When we read certain words, we bring to the reading experience a host of associations, feelings, and memories. These are not easy things to ignore, and that makes the task of carefully choosing our words an important one.

Such is the case when we talk about the Church and environmentalism. The word “environmentalism” is fraught with political connotations, and is steeped in a long history of liberal progressivism. While the Church is given a charge to take care of our earthly home, the principles and language of this movement run contrary to God’s word.

In America, environmentalism began its political journey in the counter-culture of the 1960’s, which was a time of seeking spiritual fulfillment in anything but Christianity. In this atmosphere, environmentalism was infused with a spiritual quality of finding oneself through unity with nature, which has continued to this day. In this regard, environmentalism began as a movement that was about treating nature as deity, which flies in the face of a Christian ecology.

But in principle, shouldn’t at least some of the tenets of environmentalism appeal to Christians? After all, on the surface it’s about sustainability and making sure that the natural resources we have now are there for future generations. It’s about getting pollution out of our water and air so that we can breathe a little easier about the future of our world. Isn’t that something we should want? And on the surface, the answer is yes.

This is a world that we as Christians are absolutely called to preserve. There are hundreds of references throughout Scripture to Creation reflecting the glory of God (try Psalm 19 on for size). God created our world and took care to make it beautiful. He specifically told us to take care of the Earth, and to nurture it (Genesis 1:28). In fact, the first man Adam was primarily a gardener, whose task was to improve the Garden. Many of the patriarchs in the Old Testament were farmers and ranchers, who developed and cultivated the earth to bring forth abundance.

But the reason that Biblical Christianity stands in opposition to environmentalism is because a Biblical understanding of the world places the environment under the care and nurture of humankind, while still recognizing the inherent value of nature because God created it. Environmentalism in its widely understood form is practically a religion in of itself that places worship of nature above that of the Creator. In his book, Pollution and the Death of Man, Francis Schaeffer understood the modern environmentalist movement to be glorified pantheism (meaning it was an attempt to find salvation through a sense of oneness with nature). But Schaeffer also said that while man and nature are distinct, we have a responsibility to recognize that nature has value because God created it.

It is because of this spiritual ethos surrounding environmentalism that we should seek to stay away from aligning it with a Biblical view of ecology. Traditionally, Christians have used the terminology of “stewardship” to refer to our responsibility regarding nature. The terminology of “environmentalism” brings echoes of something very un-Christian with it and we should seek to avoid parading any “ism” around without investigating its roots. We want a Christ-centric view of the environment and because Christ has redeemed us in our entirety, including our speech, we should be careful to use words that reflect a Christ-centric ecology.

This is not just a matter of preference since the language of environmentalism is steeped in the counter-culture tradition of the 1960’s and a pantheistic view of the world. The associations, feelings, and historical meaning of “environmentalism” won’t go away simply because we start slapping a Christian label on it (just think of the debate among Christians about the pagan origins of our various holidays, a debate that has raged for many, many years). The language of stewardship rightly puts the emphasis on our God-given responsibility to care for what He has given us.

Let’s celebrate our Christian heritage and our charge from Jesus to take care of our home. Let’s recognize that nature has value because God created it. But let’s remember to use language that draws attention to the Creator over the creation.  

A Journey Well-Ended

This is a true story. It’s a story about friendship and saying goodbye, and the songs and meanings that connect us. In this case, it’s “It Is Well With My Soul”. This is from my mom’s blog at PraiseNotes.com. She’s a piano teacher that specializes in teaching students over Skype and she loves the hymns. Enjoy!

Header_feather

My neighborhood is prone to adventures. I do not mean the stuff of storybooks, of exotic locales, of great deeds and daring, all with happy endings. No, not those kind of adventures, but the kind that a mind-your-own-business, busy-at-work, up-to-my-eyeballs-in-projects person would rather avoid. Adventures like the next door neighbor pounding on the door at two in the morning pleading for help because her boyfriend was threatening her life; an adventure like coming home to the street blocked off, SWAT teams patrolling around our home and neighborhood and the police helicopter circling overhead; an adventure like discovering the gate busted open by policemen chasing a fugitive who decided to make a quick escape through the backyard. Mind you, thanks be to the Lord, this did not all happen in one week, or month, or even year, but nevertheless, they are the kind of adventures that can unnerve and drive one to prayer.

And to prayer I did go. It was a simple prayer, but, believe me, very heartfelt: “Lord, please send me Christian neighbors.” God answered that prayer in an unforgettable way.

It began with a phone call from my former roommate from Bible college. “Kim, I just moved my parents to your city, and I think it might even be in your neighborhood. Where do you live?” I told her my street address. I was shocked to hear her say that she had moved her parents across the street two houses away from my home!

Jane N.

Jane

From that day on, a precious friendship began to grow with my new neighbor, Jane. Over the next short years we enjoyed: “tea time” (that always included prayer); sharing our concerns and hopes; playing the piano; sharing our favorite hymns. Her husband was also a dear friend. There were times I would look out my front window and see Rod working unbidden in our front yard, helping us in our feeble attempts at gardening. Jane and her husband eventually moved out of our neighborhood and relocated to a different state. We continued to stay in contact with one another and maintained a close friendship.

A few years later, I received another phone call; this time it was from Jane. “Hi, Kim, my husband and I flew in this morning, and we are here to visit family and friends to say good-bye. I have pancreatic cancer and the doctors have given me only a few weeks to live. Can I come over in an hour to see you?” As she spoke these words, my heart dropped with sorrow as I contemplated this coming loss. I was also anxious and feeling overwhelmed to see her on such short notice, not knowing what I should say or do when she arrived. I wanted to comfort them, but I was not sure how. When Jane and her husband arrived it was obvious what I needed to do. I asked what hymns were their favorites. As I played my piano, we sang the hymns that had inspired, comforted and taught them so much of the Savior’s love. We then prayed together for the last time. Singing the hymns filled our hearts with gratitude towards God, and we found relief for our suffering souls. When Jane left that day, she said good-bye and said that she would see me in heaven. We hugged and both shed tears as we knew we were ending a journey here on earth.
A few weeks later I played the piano at her memorial service. Though I didn’t know most of the people at her memorial service, we were one in Christ and sang together the hymn “It is Well with my Soul”.

When peace, like a river, attendeth my way,
When sorrows like sea billows roll;
Whatever my lot, Thou has taught me to say,
It is well, it is well, with my soul.

(Refrain)
It is well, with my soul,
It is well, it is well, with my soul.

Though Satan should buffet, though trials should come,
Let this blest assurance control,
That Christ has regarded my helpless estate,
And hath shed His own blood for my soul.

My sin, oh, the bliss of this glorious thought!
My sin, not in part but the whole,
Is nailed to the cross, and I bear it no more,
Praise the Lord, praise the Lord, O my soul!

For me, be it Christ, be it Christ hence to live:
If Jordan above me shall roll,
No pang shall be mine, for in death as in life
Thou wilt whisper Thy peace to my soul.

But, Lord, ’tis for Thee, for Thy coming we wait,
The sky, not the grave, is our goal;
Oh, trump of the angel! Oh, voice of the Lord!
Blessed hope, blessed rest of my soul!

And Lord, haste the day when my faith shall be sight,
The clouds be rolled back as a scroll;
The trump shall resound, and the Lord shall descend,
Even so, it is well with my soul.

For thousands of years, the saints have passed from the church militant to the church triumphant surrounded by family, friends and pastors, who offer the comfort, first and foremost, of the Word of God, but also of singing the hymns of the faith—those songs that are so infused with poetry and doctrine that they, by the work of the Holy Spirit, give comfort and life, even to a dying soul. May the Lord in his mercy preserve these songs for the generations to come who will one day sing with my dear friend Jane, “It is well with my soul!”

A beginner piano arrangement of “It Is Well” is available in our online store.

 

Please visit Praisenotes.com to learn more about my mom and her music.

Stop Focusing on Millenials

Millennials like holding small churches as well.

Millennials like holding small churches as well. Image links to source.

Lately, there’s been a lot of talk about “millennials”. Millennials, according to the Internet, are a group of highly narcissistic Facebook addicts that can’t find time for church, otherwise known as people who were born between 1980 and 2000.

At least that’s what you might think if you read a few of these articles demanding that the church start catering to the “needs” of millennials (as if millennials don’t have the same needs as everyone else). One article I read said that millennials have “highly sensitive BS meters” and can detect any hint of untruthfulness in church. That seemed pretty narcissistic to me.

Here’s the thing: the church is not here to validate you. No, it’s really not. It is not a social institution designed to cater to consumers, despite the deplorable entertainment mindset of the modern church. The church is the bride of Christ. And it’s job is to serve Christ and propagate the Gospel.

The question, “Why are the millennials leaving the church?” should be completely irrelevant to any church that is faithfully submitting to Christ and preaching the word of God. Because any church that is faithfully preaching the Word of God doesn’t have to care about membership numbers. This is because numbers don’t matter, faithfulness does. The question is, “Are we serving Christ and preaching the Gospel?”

If young people are leaving your church, there’s two possible explanations: 1) the church is unfaithful and in sin OR 2) the person is unfaithful and in sin. In all the discussions about millennials leaving churches, it’s amazing that no one has stopped to ask, “Well, maybe the millennials are wrong for leaving.”

Whoa there. Do I dare suggest that young people born between 1980-2000 might actually be sinners? That perhaps have unbiblical expectations for what a church should do? And some of them may be leaving for sinful reasons?

Millennials (of which I am one) are people too. They need the Gospel and Jesus just like Generation X and the Baby Boomers. A church that’s preaching the Gospel and Jesus doesn’t need to worry about young people leaving, unless the church is in sin.

Is there a problem that so many people are leaving the churches in America? Yes, and I don’t mean to suggest that the decline in membership in churches is actually JUST the millennial generation’s fault. Churches have largely failed their members, but that includes ALL their members, not just millennials. The point I’m trying to make is that there are two sides to this coin, and we would be remiss if we didn’t examine both.

If you leave a church because it’s petty and judgmental and failing to preach the Gospel, that’s a good thing.

But if you leave because the church biblically declares sin to be what it is and that’s offensive to you, then the blame is on you.

What do you think? Is the focus on millennials too strong, or rightly placed? 

Do You Treat the Church Like a Corporation?

Click for photo souce

Click for photo source

There’s a trend in modern American Christianity. Whether this trend is of our own doing, or is a product of our culture is a subject of debate. There’s a lot of social and historical reasons why we fall into these trends, and it would be great to explore them a little later on. What is this trend?

You could call it the commercialization of the church, and it’s all about running the church like it’s a corporation.

The Church is Not A Company

This is everywhere. Pastors are posting incessantly on their blogs about how to “grow your church” or “attract new followers” or “increase attendance”. Recently, there was a blog from one of these “church consultants” entitled 8 Reasons Most Churches Never Break the 200 Attendance Mark. At the start of the article, the author states that there’s nothing wrong with small churches. He then proceeds to list 8 reasons why being a small church is a negative. The problem was that this list could have applied to a small business, not a church.

And therein lies the problem: too many people view the church as a corporation that has to turn a profit or meet quarterly goals or boost sales to appease shareholders. In the church-as-corporation world, if a church isn’t growing every week, then something must be wrong with it. Never mind the fact that the vast majority of American churches have less than 100 members in attendance. While we do have a responsibility to go out into our community and witness to others about the Gospel, we can’t force growth. It has to be blessed by God, and if we try and make our church more like a business in order to attract followers, we risk losing the Gospel in the process.

Pastors Are Caretakers, Not CEOs

In the list mentioned above, the number one reason the author says is wrong with small churches is that the pastor is the primary caregiver. It’s hard to read a Christian list that claims that the number one problem with church growth in America is actually the most important thing that pastors are supposed to do (1 Peter 5:2-3). As in, that’s literally the definition of pastor. If we didn’t have the mindset that the church is a business, we wouldn’t be listing Biblical commands as “problems”.

It’s can be a little sad when there’s a funeral or a wedding and the pastor officiating talks about the parties involved in an abstract kind of way because he doesn’t have a personal relationship with them. It’s valuable to have a pastor that can actually relate to the people involved because it’s been his job to shepherd them as part of his flock. We live in the age of the celebrity pastor, where it’s fashionable to strive to have the largest Twitter/Facebook/Blog following that you can have. It’s almost as if the success of ministry is measured by the number of Facebook likes. Is that the way Jesus wanted the church to be run?

The Purpose of the Church

The truth is that when the focus of a church becomes all about growth and achieving set goals and increasing membership, the ministry of the church gets lost. It’s ironic how we can be so focused on growing attendance that we offer nothing when the attendees arrive. Did Jesus want His church to be all about “acting like a big organization” and “increasing membership”? Sure, growth is a good thing, and we should be doing our job to try and grow. But ultimately, the Holy Spirit and the work of Jesus is what grows a church. When you start arbitrarily setting membership goals that you can only reach by God’s grace, the temptation is strong to start incorporating entertainment and gimmicks to gain membership.

Jesus said, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit,  teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you. And behold, I am with you always, to the end of the age.” (Matthew 28:18-20)

The foundation of growing a church is letting Jesus grow it, and making disciples of all nations and preaching the Gospel faithfully. The moment the mission of the Gospel is eclipsed by business-like goals, something has gone wrong. There is no point in asking sinners to fellowship with other sinners in the light of redemptive grace if our intent in leading them to worship is not so they can know Christ, but so that we can add a number to our count. We should pray that the Gospel comes first, and that any effort to grow the church is done in submission to Him. It’s His church, after all.

What do you think? Overreaction or spot on? Sound off in the comments about your thoughts on the commercialization of the church. 

Why You Shouldn’t Wait For Marriage

waiting-on-the-lord1

Pretty picture

The title of this post may seem like I’m going to launch into a neo-Christian heresy about how the Greek root of such-and-such word actually means that we can have sex whenever we want, and waiting for marriage is a sham.

But that’s not what this post is about, so you can put away your pitchforks and douse your torches.

Should you wait for marriage to have sex? Yes, that’s so soundly Biblical it’s not even open for debate. But there are good reasons on WHY we should wait and there are bad reason, and there is one popular reason that I’ve discovered that really isn’t Biblical.

Marriage Isn’t The Ultimate Goal

I ran into this blog from Grace for the road that was published about a year and a half ago, talking about why she got rid of her purity ring. The post was called I Don’t Wait Anymore. To give you an idea of what she’s talking about, here’s a killer quote from that post:

“But many of them – if they’re honest – will tell you that time has passed, and it’s wrecking their view of God.

If this is who God’s supposed to be, then He’s tragically late.

So some decide to chuck “Lady in Waiting” out the window … and possibly their virginity with it. Church goes next. God might go next, too. If He doesn’t answer these prayers after they’ve held up their end of the bargain, why would He answer any others?

Whether it was the fault of the leaders, the fault of us girls, or both, a tragedy happened back then.

A lot of girls were sold on a deal and not on a Savior. [emphasis added]”

There is a longstanding movement to sign the little pledge card, put on your purity ring, and then commit to waiting for marriage. Which is awesome, because you should wait to have sex until you’re married. But inadvertently, that little card or purity ring comes to mean something else entirely, that you’re making a deal with God by exchanging your patience for His promise. But it doesn’t work that way. Waiting for marriage is about glorifying God in Christ through obedience; not a leverage mechanism for forcing a spouse out of God.

Being Single Can Suck…I Know

I deeply sympathize with my brothers and sisters in Christ who are patiently searching for a spouse. But even for those married or engaged couples, marriage is not the end goal. Christ is. As the author of the blog states, we need a savior, not a deal. It’s so easy to let our perceptions of our own happiness cloud what we really, truly need, which is Christ.

As humans, we often put our faith in Christ on a conditional basis; contingent upon our circumstances. When our circumstances change, our faith wavers. And in this case, faith becomes attached to waiting for a spouse, and when one doesn’t show up, the faith disappears.

I guess the point is that we are fulfilled in Christ already and marriage will not change that. We have every thing we need in Him. Just like Ephesians 1:3 says, we have been blessed with ALL blessings in Christ. We have it all.

Don’t Give Up

So I just want to say, don’t give up. Don’t make your faith in Christ contingent on a circumstance in your life, because He actually is working everything for your good, if you love Him (Romans 8:28). Wait because it matters to God, but don’t wait because you think you can store up brownie points with Jesus that you can eventually cash in for a spouse.

That’s it. I hope I came across well, but please sound off in the comments if you have a different perspective!

3 Ways Men Have Failed Women

(c) vino on flickr

(c) vino on flickr

Our generation has lost what it means to be a man. This problem is well-noted by many in society, from churches to social commentators to websites like Art of Manliness that focus on teaching modern day men to recover what has been lost. Men have become accustomed to being takers and not givers, which has helped contribute to the breakdown in the family. Many of society’s ills can be traced back to this breakdown, especially considering that the greatest indicator for poverty is marital status. Men have abdicated their responsibility, so I thought it would be beneficial to look at  three important ways that men have failed women, especially in this generation.

#3. We Stopped Working

The Problem: We treat our lives outside of a “job” as a recreational opportunity, devoid of responsibility.

The Analysis: Brett McKay of Art of Manliness has written how modern man’s dilemma is that he no longer strives to take responsibility for everything in his life. We may work in the sense that we have the 9-5 job that brings home the bacon, but the temptation is so strong to just “tune out” and ignore our families and communities. Sometimes, the tuning out is just a way of life, to the point where we become so completely adverse to responsibility that we become completely unproductive human beings. It gets so bad that we outsource our usefulness to women, which is ultimately a disservice to them, because now they have to be twice as productive to compensate for deadbeat men. We abdicated our responsibility to women, who now feel that they have to be the responsible adults in relationships (whether romantic or otherwise). On every level, it is pathetic for a man to implicitly force a woman to carry the weight that should rest on his shoulders. In a very real sense, it’s sexism because it forces a woman to balance to roles, even if the woman feels empowered for having more power in the relationship.

The Cure: Own up to our sin of laziness and apathy and learn the lessons of Proverbs 6:6.

#2. We Fueled the Internet Pornography Empire

The Problem: When we decided that a woman was not a worthy thing to fight for, we began using them.

The Analysis: Porn is a big problem. Like, a really, really, really HUGE problem. The average age of exposure for porn is 11 years old. For every 10 men in church, 5 are struggling with pornography. And to give you an idea of the prevalence of this problem, 70% of 18-to-24-year-old men visit pornographic sites in a typical month. 66% of men in their 20s and 30s also report being regular users of pornography (Source). The fact is that this generation of men has grown up with instantaneous access to every kind of hardcore pornography in existence. It’s not just on our computers anymore. It’s on our mobile devices and every other kind of Internet connected gadget. Porn teaches us that women are objects to be used for our own conquests. It kills our instinct to protect those who are weak and vulnerable and instead exploits people for profit (it’s no coincidence that modern sex trafficking has kept pace with the porn industry). Not to mention it does tremendous damage to personal relationships by eroding trust and intimacy. There is a lot out there on why porn is insanely destructive, and it’s not the purpose here to delve into all of the reasons why it’s destructive. But the fact is that we have once again abandoned our responsibility to guard our hearts and our eyes and protect our sisters. We have absolutely failed women in this regard because we have done the worst possible thing: we have turned women into commodities.

The Cure: Get on your face before Jesus and learn the lessons of Psalm 118:5 and numerous other verses that feature crying out to God. Cry out to God and he will hear you. And if you’re in real trouble, visit Setting Captives Free.

#1. We Stopped Caring About Kids

The Problem: Along with using porn as a cheap substitute for love and intimacy, men decided that kids were a burden that needed to be abandoned.

The Analysis: Fatherlessness is another huge problem. There are studies upon studies that document the damage done when a father walks out on their kids. Numerous Hollywood blockbusters feature main characters that have “Daddy issues”. The truth is that there is no greater responsibility than caring for a child. Since men in this generation are experts in avoiding responsibility, ditching children is a no-brainer for the footloose and fancy free man. And what’s the easiest way to ditch your kids? For many, the answer is abortion. (The recent campaign known as #brochoice is a perfect summary of men who want to shirk responsibility and use women purely as sexual objects). Boyfriends pressuring their girlfriends to get an abortion is a fairly frequent phenomena. They want to avoid the responsibility, and if they don’t succeed in convincing their girlfriends to get abortions, they leave, and even when they do get it, they still leave. Some sources say that up to 70% of romantic relationships end after an abortion (Source). Fatherlessness is a growing epidemic, with as many as 1/4 of all children living without a father, and in many minority communities, the number is much higher (Source). The result: men have failed women by creating legions of single mothers, who are the most likely in society to live in poverty.

The Cure: Own up to our responsibility to be husbands and fathers. Learn the lessons of Psalm 127: 3-5.

I’m in no way suggesting that these problems are new (using women as objects is a problem as old as Adam). But in some ways, they seem to have particularly potent influence on this generation, and something needs to be done about it. Men need to grow up, take responsibility and turn to the only one who can really change them: Jesus Christ.

That’s it! If you liked the post, leave a comment or like it and follow! Thanks!

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